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SCCC professor unearthing history at long-lost Old Fort

15 Halcyon Street in Scotia is purported to be the site of the Nicholas Veeder home/museum based on archaeological evidence. Here, Ronald Kingsley of the SCCC Community Archaeology Program points out bricks from the 1800s. From l-r: Scotia Mayor Kris Kastberg, Ron Simmons of Purdy Realty, Laura Conrad of Purdy and Beverly Clark, Scotia Village Historian.
15 Halcyon Street in Scotia is purported to be the site of the Nicholas Veeder home/museum based on archaeological evidence. Here, Ronald Kingsley of the SCCC Community Archaeology Program points out bricks from the 1800s. From l-r: Scotia Mayor Kris Kastberg, Ron Simmons of Purdy Realty, Laura Conrad of Purdy and Beverly Clark, Scotia Village Historian.
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Somewhere between 1891 and 2013, a piece of Scotia’s history was lost. By many accounts, the Old Fort did once exist. Built in the 1750s, the fort was remembered mostly as a ramshackle structure constructed largely from stone, but also some wood. More than a century later, Union College students who visited the site described it in a report as ancient-looking, its entrance guarded by “massive doors and heavy irons.” Inside were Revolutionary War relics ...


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comments

LNMP
August 9, 2013
3:45 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Fascinating stuff! I love local history.

SchenectadyScott
August 9, 2013
6:18 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Nice job. We are fortunate to have Professor Kingsley at SCCC. My ancestry goes through the Veeder line. We are so blessed to have this history and the records kept to document our nation's history.

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