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Historian to discuss life of local blacks in early days

Theodore Sedgewick Wright, son of Richard P.G. Wright, barber and Underground Rail-road facilitator, was the first  black man to graduate from Princeton Seminary. Historian Marsha Mortimore tells their story as part of Schenectady County Community College’s celebration of Black History Month. (photo: Yale University)
Theodore Sedgewick Wright, son of Richard P.G. Wright, barber and Underground Rail-road facilitator, was the first black man to graduate from Princeton Seminary. Historian Marsha Mortimore tells their story as part of Schenectady County Community College’s celebration of Black History Month. (photo: Yale University)
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From Vicksburg to Schenectady, Charles Nelson, a 15-year-old slave, followed all the rules. Then, with the help of a black barber named Richard P.G. Wright, he dared to become a free man. At midnight on a summer evening in 1838, Nelson met Wright in a dark corner of Schenectady, and the latter put the young man in the charge of a local Quaker who took him to Saratoga Springs. Once there, noted abolitionist Mason Anthony ...


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