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State grants target energy innovation

NYSERDA funding goes to 3 regional firms

NYSERDA President and CEO, Francis J. Murray Jr.  announced $1.2 million to three Capital Region companies to spur commercialization of energy-saving manufacturing techniques at Automated Dynamics in Schenectady on Thursday morning. The three companies are Automated Dynamics, ThermoAura Inc. of Troy and Ecovative Design of Green Island.
In front of a Ytterbium Laser System at Automated Dynamics, Project Engineer, Zachary August, shows strengths and weaknesses of the carbon fiber tape, used in thermo bonding carbon fiber with plastic matrix. This innovative machinery is used to build strong, lightweight parts by fusing multiple layers of composite materials via a laser-heated process. The new machinery is projected to improve the energy efficiency of parts in additive manufacturing by 63 percent.
Photographer: Marc Schultz
NYSERDA President and CEO, Francis J. Murray Jr. announced $1.2 million to three Capital Region companies to spur commercialization of energy-saving manufacturing techniques at Automated Dynamics in Schenectady on Thursday morning. The three companies are Automated Dynamics, ThermoAura Inc. of Troy and Ecovative Design of Green Island. In front of a Ytterbium Laser System at Automated Dynamics, Project Engineer, Zachary August, shows strengths and weaknesses of the carbon fiber tape, used in thermo bonding carbon fiber with plastic matrix. This innovative machinery is used to build strong, lightweight parts by fusing multiple layers of composite materials via a laser-heated process. The new machinery is projected to improve the energy efficiency of parts in additive manufacturing by 63 percent.
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Strips of carbon fiber used at Automated Dynamics can be found in everything from the drive shaft in a helicopter to the drill used for oil exploration. The Schenectady-based manufacturer now uses an intense blast of electrically heated nitrogen gas to temper these fibers so they are more durable and can be molded. Only this blast — ranging up to 1,000 degrees Centigrade — is extremely inefficient, sometimes wasting nearly 70 percent of the energy ...


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