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Outlook 2013: From TV to lamps, Schenectady has a rich past in innovations

General Electric engineer Ernst Alexanderson watches the first demonstration of a home television with his family in his Schenectady house on Jan. 13, 1928.  The television, which operated using a mechanical spinning disk, featured a screen only 3 inches in diameter. (Photo provided)
General Electric engineer Ernst Alexanderson watches the first demonstration of a home television with his family in his Schenectady house on Jan. 13, 1928. The television, which operated using a mechanical spinning disk, featured a screen only 3 inches in diameter. (Photo provided)
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If Schenectady isn’t the birthplace of every modern day appliance we now take for granted, it’s at least the place where many of them grew to maturation. The radio, the television, the lamp, and the refrigerator, to name just a few, were all improved and made more accessible to the public by the General Electric Co. in Schenectady, where innovation by curious scientists has been a staple for over a century. For miSci curator and ...


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