The Daily Gazette
The Locally Owned Voice of the Capital Region
Advertisement
Promotions

CDPHP grant to help expand health care training program

CDPHP has committed critical funding to the SCCC Foundation to support SCCC’s Health Professions Opportunity Grants (HPOG), a program that provides educational and employment assistance for low-income students being trained for careers in health care. SCCC’s Albany HPOG, located at 175 Central Ave., Albany, has grown since the College first began offering classes and labs there in April 2011. More than 560 students have graduated from the HPOG program, and many have gone on to serve as valuable professionals in the expanding health care field. It is funded through a Health Profession Opportunity Grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Administration for Children and Families.   
William Rowe,RN and instructor, center, watches as student Iva Darlington performs a Range of Motion (ROM) on the knee of fellow student Chris Caulking. Student Thomas Moore at left, looks on and observes.
Photographer: Marc Schultz
CDPHP has committed critical funding to the SCCC Foundation to support SCCC’s Health Professions Opportunity Grants (HPOG), a program that provides educational and employment assistance for low-income students being trained for careers in health care. SCCC’s Albany HPOG, located at 175 Central Ave., Albany, has grown since the College first began offering classes and labs there in April 2011. More than 560 students have graduated from the HPOG program, and many have gone on to serve as valuable professionals in the expanding health care field. It is funded through a Health Profession Opportunity Grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Administration for Children and Families. William Rowe,RN and instructor, center, watches as student Iva Darlington performs a Range of Motion (ROM) on the knee of fellow student Chris Caulking. Student Thomas Moore at left, looks on and observes.
  • FACEBOOK
  • TWITTER
  • GOOGLE+
  • LINKEDIN
  • PRINT
  • E-MAIL
Text Size: A | A

Last summer, Lisa Columbus noticed a sign posted outside an old, familiar brick building on Sheridan Avenue: “Now enrolling. Head Start. Ages 3-4.” She walked into the Albany Community Action Partnership offices to fill out an application for her 4-year-old son, but walked out with an education plan for herself as well. The staff had told Columbus about the Health Profession Opportunity Grant program — an initiative to help low-income students prepare for careers in ...


You Must Log-In or Subscribe to Continue Subscription Offer Individual stories can be found and purchased from our Archives for $2.00

Advertisement

comments

There are currently no posts. Be the first to comment on this story.
Advertisement