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Should individual teacher evaluations be released to the public?

Yes 51% 268 votes
No 48% 253 votes
Total Votes: 521

Note: This is not a scientific poll.

comments


April 11, 2012
11:05 a.m.

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Waleeta ( Waleeta ) says...

I believe parents voice should be one of many considerations in evaluating schools, teachers and administrators. The first thing we need to do is stop expecting teachers to solve every problem that comes along. Second, do not expect excellence in teaching when, because of budget constraints, class size is increased, and children with behavior problems and special needs are squeezed in with children eager to learn with no one to assist the teacher so she/he can give them the extra help they need. Teachers also need parents help!! Children need to come to school ready to learn. A hungry child, or a child experiencing degradion among family members in the home comes to school with too much on their minds to pay attention to math or science or reading.
The public is too concerned with the bottom line - cost- to objectively receive teacher evaluations. Yes teachers performance, like everyone elses, need to be evaluated and constructively improved but all factors need to be considered. The public, as a whole, does not have the objectivity to consider all these factors.

April 11, 2012
7:40 p.m.

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jonw757 ( jonw757 ) says...

I vote no. I do not believe the system has the brain power to review teachers fairly, otherwise I would say yes.

April 12, 2012
8:48 a.m.

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march84 ( march84 ) says...

What a horrible idea...don't know why anyone would ever want to be a teacher with all the negative scrutiny they get. Yes, there are some bad teachers but how about giving the good ones a break! Just sayin'!

April 12, 2012
10:15 p.m.

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ajdjr73 ( ajdjr73 ) says...

parents do not have the ability to rate a teacher. I teach biology and I teach evolution. Parents can get me canned because I teach a component of the curriculum required by the state and international standards. Gimme a break,

April 13, 2012
3:07 p.m.

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poupore ( poupore ) says...

First off, I am not a teacher. Secondly, I am all for transparency, but what is to be gained by making teacher evaluations available to the public? Knowing whether a teacher receives a good or poor evaluation isn't going to create a mechanism to help him/her improve. It isn't going to create a way to get rid of them if they are persistently failing. All it's going to do is give ammunition to all of the teacher haters of the world.
I think that this whole discussion is really a waste of time. It's no secret why some schools have high graduation rates and others low; and it doesn't have anything to do with the teachers. The problems are concentrated poverty and concentrated wealth. And many of our communities are rigidly segregated by income rather than race. Undoubtedly, there are always examples of people who rise up from the most difficult of circumstances, but the fact remains that on average, your entire life outcomes (school, health, income level, mortality) can be largely predicted just by your mother’s educational attainment. We live in a country that is increasingly hostile toward the poor, and so when we see statistics like public schools with less the 50 percent graduation rates we want to blame the teachers when the real problems, and their solutions, are far more complex. However, most people prefer an easy answer, especially when it lets them off the hook morally.

April 13, 2012
4:35 p.m.

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mickeyg59 ( mickeyg59 ) says...

Teachers receive a comparatively competitive pay - and should be evaluated against consistent standards like all other workers are. Maybe we should get their input on what those standards should be. As for making them public - maybe generally but not individually - companies don't make their individual evaluations public.

One of the difficult issues is teachers having to deal with behavioral issues - with little support from parents. Parents should either become responsible for their children's behavuior and teach them correct conduct and respect, or accept discipline that teachers and/or administrators administer - short of physical punishment.

April 13, 2012
6:51 p.m.

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mrobarge ( mrobarge ) says...

But Mickey, the difference between schools and companies is that we don't directly pay the salaries of those who work for private companies ... Just like when the salaries of public employees were made public, I would argue that it's one of the prices you pay for being a public servant ... And quite honestly, if you're doing your job, you shouldn't care if the world knows how well you do your job ... Keeping them private only covers for those who aren't doing their jobs.

April 15, 2012
7:43 a.m.

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cfield ( cfield ) says...

Doctors, Lawyers, Politicians, and Teachers should all be evaluated!!!!

April 15, 2012
9:17 a.m.

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myshortpencil ( myshortpencil ) says...

I vote yes, but with a modification. The evaluation results for all public employees, including firefighters and police officers, must be posted online for all to see, however the names of those evaluated must not be released. Rather, the database of evaluations should substitute a unique number for each person evaluated, so those using the database can see how individual performance changes over time without knowing who the person is. If the evaluation database is not released there will be no public oversight and no public accountability. The whole enterprise will be run to benefit the insiders rather than the students and the public.

I propose nothing new, here. Confidential information is routinely shared with anonymous identities.

The next question is whether parents should have access to the evaluations of those who teach their children? I'm inclined to say no. I don't want parents looking at a few numbers and thinking they know what they need to know to monitor the quality of their children's educations. I want them to use constant vigilance. I believe parents will treat evaluations like an insurance policy. This will create a kind of "moral hazard," which will cause parents to be less vigilant than they otherwise would be, except for the very few teachers who get poor evaluations. Even exemplary teachers have bad days and weeks. Parents need to stay on top of what's happening in the classroom.

April 15, 2012
9:22 a.m.

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myshortpencil ( myshortpencil ) says...

I might add that even poor teachers have good days and weeks. In fact they probably have more good ones than bad ones.

April 15, 2012
6:14 p.m.

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robbump ( robbump ) says...

Should the students' individual evaluations also be made public? After all, don't we taxpayers have a right to know if we're getting what we paid for? Did they turn in their homework?

How about the teachers' notes about the parents they have met during conferences, or more importantly, what parents have NOT met with their kids' instructors.

And how about comprehension and reasoning test results for our mayors, councilmen, assemblymen, etc. Where does the idea of public disclosure end?

April 15, 2012
11:39 p.m.

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mezz3131 ( mezz3131 ) says...

If you are going to make the teacher evaluations public then the school district should be able to make public the reasons why many students in that teacher's classroom are failing. This should include the number of days the student missed, the number of parent/teacher conferences the parent missed. The number of unsigned failing notices that went home but didn't come back. The tape recorded conversations with the parent that they don't have time to help their child, they have other things to do. There are many students like this and what's fair is fair.

 

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