Garden greets visitors to city

First impressions are always important and the city of Gloversville is no exception.
Barbara Morris works Tuesday at deadheading pink cornflowers in her Paradise Perennials garden in Gloversville.
PHOTOGRAPHER:
Barbara Morris works Tuesday at deadheading pink cornflowers in her Paradise Perennials garden in Gloversville.

First impressions are always important and the city of Gloversville is no exception.

Barbara Morris, who arguably owns the first house on the first street entering the city, has put in a lot of work dressing up what would be the city’s southern gate on Harrison Street.

And, starting last week, Morris may make some money doing it. Since buying her house a decade ago and finding the grass and weeds waist high, Morris has worked hard turning every square foot of her yard into perennial gardens and pathways.

As she pointed out Tuesday, perennials come back year after year and spread, forcing gardeners to make hard decisions about discarding or giving away the fruits of their labors or starting a business.

Morris obtained her business documents last week for “Paradise Perennials.”

She has more than 100 varieties of perennials and also sells some fruit and vegetable plants.

As the plants spread, she said, she pots them in preparation for sale. Depending on varieties, pots sell for up to $12.

In recognition that others in her situation will not resort to starting a business, she said she accepts and sells perennials on consignment from fellow gardeners.

Most of Morris’ stock, she said, originated in the gardens of family members. She said she has pursued her hobby for 30 years and in that time has made many mistakes.

Since moving to Gloversville from Ohio, she said she killed a number of plants trying to find those resistant to the salt washing off Harrison Street. Morris’ garden starts right at the edge of the pavement. For a year or so she put some plastic flowers in that first row.

Most people starting out don’t worry about soil and sun requirements, she said, and rarely consider the growth potential of certain plants they may have to eventually cut down.

“It’s not really work to me, it’s something I enjoy,” she said of her gardening accomplishments.

“Every flower that blooms is like a mini-miracle to me.”

She said her husband, George Morris, is taking an interest, making a daily tour and reporting back on every bloom he spots.

A number of plants are in bloom, but Morris tells a visitor the poppies and irises were something special last week.

City Clerk Brenda Pedrick said she has noticed Morris’ efforts and believes it’s a “nice touch” entering the city. “I think it lends a little ambience,” said Pedrick.

Categories: Schenectady County

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