Gloversville police chief leads list of highest-paid workers

The 2009 list of Gloversville’s top-paid employees is once against dominated by police officers.
PHOTOGRAPHER:

The 2009 list of Gloversville’s top-paid employees is once against dominated by police officers.

The list, obtained Tuesday, also shows that former Mayor Tim Hughes sold $1,532 worth of unused vacation time back to the city. The Common Council later blocked his effort to sell back an additional $11,000 in unused vacation, sick and personal time.

Hughes and former City Attorney John Clo, who did not sell back any time in 2009, had availed themselves of that option in prior years. Clo sold back more than $16,000 in unused time from 2006 to 2008, and Hughes received about $6,600 over the same period.

Police Chief Edgar Beaudin leads the list for 2009, receiving $87,061. His base salary of $73,836 was augmented by $2,000 in longevity pay, $200 in command pay, $5,912 from selling unused holiday time and $5,113 from selling unused sick time.

On the list behind Beaudin are:

Capt. James Lorenzoni, $82,639, with a base salary of $65,643, $9,271 in overtime, $2,000 for longevity, $200 in command pay, $5,003 in unused holiday time and $520 in unused vacation time.

Fire Chief Douglas Edwards, $78,227, with a base salary of $74,796, $2,000 in longevity and $1,456 in unused holiday time.

Capt. Donald Van Deusen, $77,260, with a base salary of $65,665, $5,063 in overtime, $200 in command pay, $1,350 for longevity and $5,003 in unused holiday time.

Sgt. Paul Porter, $71,211, with a base salary of $56,596, $8,105 in overtime, $575 for a college degree, $200 in command pay, $1,350 for longevity and $3,673 in unused holiday time.

Detective Joseph Nowak, $70,948, with a base salary of $55,287, $8,196 in overtime, $575 for a college degree, $200 in command pay, $1,350 for longevity, $4,201 in unused holiday time and $437 in unused vacation time.

Sgt. Marc Porter, $70,673, with a base salary of $58,286, $6,231 in overtime, $575 for a college degree, $200 in command pay, $1,000 for longevity and $4,312 in unused holiday time.

Detective J. Kadle, $68,459, with a base salary of $55,140, $5,300 in overtime, a $3,000 rebate for not using city health insurance, $200 in command pay, $1,000 for longevity and $2,717 in unused holiday time.

Sgt. Blair Akers, $67,758, with a base salary of $56,596, $3,530 in overtime, $200 in command pay, $1,000 for longevity, $4,312 in unused holiday time and $448 in unused vacation time.

Officer J. Bellamy, $66,902, with a base salary of $48,776, $11,124 in overtime, $200 in command pay, $1,000 for longevity, $3,716 in unused holiday time and $386 in unused vacation time.

Detective Michael Jory, $66,651, with a base salary of $55,140, $2,509 in overtime, $2,366 in unused comp time, $575 for a college degree, $1,200 for longevity, $600 in on-call pay and $3,976 in unused holiday time.

Officer D. Coupas, $66,128, with a base salary of $48,776, $8,109 in overtime, a $3,000 health insurance rebate, $375 for a college degree, $200 in command pay, $1,000 for longevity, $3,716 in unused holiday time and $386 in unused vacation time.

Lorenzoni, the Police Department’s spokesman, pointed out that the Police Benevolent Association was the first to give up compensation for unused sick time, a concession now made by all city departments. It should also be noted, Lorenzoni said, that much of the overtime pay is covered by grant funds or by other agencies and is not charged to city taxpayers, including $28,000 in Stop DWI funding, $7,000 in school security charges, $31,000 in federal grant money for training and $11,000 from a district attorney’s impact grant paying for special patrols and drug investigations.

The police, Lorenzoni said, were also the first to increase contributions to health insurance premiums and agreed to cap remaining comp time buyouts at 175 hours.

At the same time, Lorenzoni said, the department is operating with 29 officers — 10 fewer than eight years ago — and is weakened further by having three officers injured on the job assigned to light duty.

Overtime, he said, is the only option left to respond to the complaints filed daily around the community.

Several years ago, he said, a road shift consisted of six officers and a sergeant, but now the department sometimes functions with as few as two officers and a sergeant — although sometimes there are three or four officers available.

If the compensation seems high to some, Lorenzoni said, residents should recognize that a lieutenant in the Glenville Police Department is paid $82,000 and graduates of the state police academy are paid more on their first day than top officers in Gloversville.

It was reported this week that four officers in the Amsterdam Police Department made more than $100,000 in 2009.

In the Gloversville Fire Department, the top earners below the chief were Battalion Chiefs M. Putnam at $64,091 and Beth Whitman-Putnam at $64,291, both with base salaries of $49,150. Putnam also received $3,745 in overtime, $567 in safety staffing, a $3,000 health insurance rebate, $910 for longevity, $2,695 in unused holiday time, $1,134 in unused personal time and $2,888 in unused sick time. Whitman-Putnam received $6,339 in overtime, $1,134 in safety staffing, $1,200 for longevity, $2,711 in unused holiday time, $850 in unused personal time and $2,905 in unused sick time.

Public Works Director Robert Abel was paid $66,022, with a base salary of $61,547, $946 in personal time and $3,550 in unused vacation time.

The Public Works employee below Abel was Street Maintenance Supervisor D. Knapp at $57,776 on a base salary of $40,768 plus $7,514 in overtime, $300 in clothing allowance, $3,300 for longevity, $2,381 in unused sick time and $1,597 in unused vacation time.

Categories: Schenectady County

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