Thanks for exposing the dark side of racing

*Thanks for exposing the dark side of racing *District was right to prohibit Marine sash *County ne

Thanks for exposing the dark side of racing

Thank you for publishing Kathy Guillermo’s June 28 column [“Horse deaths at race tracks should be as rare as Triple Crown winners”] about the cruel practice of drugging horses that race for our pleasure.

Horse racing is so much more than the much-touted tradition of high rollers and pretty hats. It is a systemic inhumane treatment of animals drugged and forced to run at speeds of 45 miles per hour on legs the size of our wrists.

I appreciate the balance shown by The Gazette with this opinion. I believe most horse-racing aficionados are unaware that horses die every week at racetracks in the United States, largely because of drugs that make them race when they are too tired to do so and make their bones brittle and fragile.A horse with a broken leg is usually euthanized.

Please continue to show us all sides of horse-racing. I hope a more aware public will lead to the end of cruel drugging in this sport.

Suzanne Miller

Niskayuna

District was right to prohibit Marine sash

Regarding your July 7 editorial, “Grad sashes should have been allowed,” I disagree with 99 percent of your reasoning that the Saratoga Springs school district should have allowed students to wear a sash indicating their intention to serve in the U.S. Marines.

Their intentions are to be commended, and I fully support their serving in the military. I am most proud to have served in the U.S. Navy. However, allowing graduation sashes to depict any kind of a message will open the door to others wanting to promote slogans: Ban the Guns, I love Hillary or Bush or Trump, I love Whoppers, promoting political parties, attacking religious beliefs, and on and on (you get the message).

Everyone with an agenda will be crying equal rights to wear what they want, freedom of speech and, of course, lawsuits demanding “freedoms.” You want to “consider the special circumstances … make an exception for these three young men.” However, all future requests will be “special circumstances.” Where will it end?

I agree with your comment that there was nothing “inappropriate” about the sashes. However, what is going to be “inappropriate” about future sashes? Who is to decide? This is too subjective a term. The ACLU would have a field day with this.

You chastise the district for going too far and that all they had to do was think. Well, they did and made the right decision. You are right: Rules are rules. That is the lesson for the students to learn.

Once an exception is made, there are no longer “rules.”

Saratoga Springs school officials made the right call. Although the students are to be commended for their commitment, they chose the wrong forum to express it.

Frank J. Longo

Rotterdam

County needs to put limits on fireworks

Is there a great financial benefit for Schenectady County in the newly legal sale of fireworks? I hope so, because for four nights in a row it has sounded like we were living in a war zone.

The explosions began on the evening of July 2. Relatively mild, just a pre-party warm-up.

Then on July 3 it was probably a dress rehearsal, because the noise continued late into the night. Of course on July 4, it began at 7 p.m., and lasted until 2 a.m. OK, if it is only one night a year (maybe limit it to one dress rehearsal?).

Then on July 5, when the artillery began again and lasted well beyond 10 p.m., that took it over the boundary of a once a year celebration.

I can only have sympathy for all our veterans with PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) who had to live with the sounds of a war zone in what should be a peaceful community.

Please, if the sale of fireworks has to be legal in Schenectady County, put some civilized limits as to days and hours of the noise.

Christina Anderson

Niskayuna

Too much money and time spent on Clintons

Re June 13 letter, “Clinton fans believe despite many flaws,” by Tony Russo: Let me say that yes, I did say Republicans spent too much money and time on going after Bill Clinton.

To me, $80 million is a lot of money. That is the total spent investigating the Clinton administration. Total time spent? While I did say his affair was definitely not OK, it certainly did not warrant the attention it was given. Can you honestly say it deserved the press coverage and millions spent by Ken Starr to investigate? Seriously?

And, I’m gonna go out on a limb and say more hours were clocked by Ken Starr and his 27 fleet of lawyers than Bill spent with Monica. All of that money and time. That was a crime.

Did I say or insinuate Hillary had no idea about her husband’s history with women? No.

In your opinion, she was supposed to step up to the podium in the White House, and say, yup, my husband has been having an affair with an intern. C’mon.

As far as the bottom line, as you put it, with all the time and millions spent, the Clintons have not been found guilty of anything other than agitating right-wing conservatives or Republicans. How fitting also, your letter appeared under the cartoon of Republican Dennis Hastert.

Oh, and, yes, Tony, I will be voting for Hillary, in spite of everything.

Mary Baker

Perth

Grateful to employee who went way above

I would like to talk about my experience with an employee at the Target Store on Route 50 in Glenville. I had a problem with a tiny personal razor and didn’t know how to remove the battery to it. A young man, name Mark M., who is a employee at the store, helped me but, in taking it apart, lost a little part that went to it and couldn’t find it.

He went way beyond this assistance and bought me a new one, which wasn’t expected. I have never had an experience like that before and felt he went way above and beyond what was expected of him. I want to thank him again. I feel the store has an A-plus employee and he should be recognized for this.

Helen McGrane

Charlton

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