Schenectady County

CLYNK starts Capital Region operations

There’s now one more way to get rid of your empties, and more options for what to do with that nicke
The scene Monday, March 14, 2016, at the Hannaford in Latham, where CLYNK started recycling operations in New York. From left are Brian Fabre of Hannaford; Living Resources artist Nadine Nandkissore, who created the painting on the CLYNK truck; Fred Er...
The scene Monday, March 14, 2016, at the Hannaford in Latham, where CLYNK started recycling operations in New York. From left are Brian Fabre of Hannaford; Living Resources artist Nadine Nandkissore, who created the painting on the CLYNK truck; Fred Er...

There’s now one more way to get rid of your empties, and more options for what to do with that nickel you get back for each can and bottle.

CLYNK on Monday began taking in returnables from its first Capital Region location, the Latham Hannaford, and is gearing up to begin at supermarkets in Niskayuna, Rotterdam, Glenville, Colonie and Troy in the near future.

Unlike more labor-intensive options — bringing the empties to a redemption window, or feeding them one at a time into a machine — CLYNK lets shoppers drop off a full bag with their unique bar code attached. The bar code is scanned and the contents of the bag are credited to the shoppers’ account.

The other difference: You can designate your refund to go to various community charities that have registered to become Hannaford Community Cash partners. It’s a variation on the empty can and bottle drives the local Humane Society and Scout troops run, but again, without the effort of collecting a mountain of empty soda cans.

CLYNK announced plans in December to set up New York operations at the Glenville Business and Technology Park, in former Navy Depot Building 202. Like Hannaford, CLYNK is headquartered in Maine, and the two have had a long working relationship in that state. The Latham supermarket is their start together here in New York.

“Since its arrival at our Maine stores, Hannaford shoppers have redeemed more than 600 million containers through CLYNK,” Dennis Martin, director of operations for Hannaford’s Albany Region, said in a news release.

The 36,000-square-foot Glenville facility is up and running now.

CLYNK says its options are unique among redemption services: Users can get cash for their empties, get a credit to use for in-store purchases, or send money to a charitable cause. There is a lag of two business days between dropoff and credit, to allow the bag of cans and bottles to be transported to Glenville and tallied.

Customers must buy their CLYNK bags at $1.75 per 10-pack, though the first 10 are free upon registration with CLYNK. In some cases, though, organizations hoping to benefit through Community Cash will buy the bags and give them to supporters.

The first non-profit to register as a Community Cash partner in New York is Living Resources in Albany, and it has already undertaken its first bottle drive. (Nadine Nandkissore, a Living Resources client, created the artwork that brightens the body of CLYNK’s first New York truck.)

Shoppers wanting to register with CLYNK can do so in-store or online at CLYNK.com. Organizations that want to participate for fund-raising purposes can register as a Hannaford Community Cash partner, also at CLYNK.com.

Hannaford shoppers who don’t want to use CLYNK still will have the option of using the automated redemption machines that have been in supermarket lobbies for years.

“Our goal at CLYNK has always been to make recycling easier for everyone, and expanding into New York is a true milestone for our organization in living out our mission,” CLYNK CEO Clayton Kyle said in a news release.

Reach Gazette business editor John Cropley at 395-3104, [email protected] or @cropjohn on Twitter.

Categories: Business, News

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