Schenectady

Absentee counts next week in close Woerner-Catalfamo Assembly race

David M. Catalfamo, left, and Carrie Woerner.
PHOTOGRAPHER:

David M. Catalfamo, left, and Carrie Woerner.

Categories: News, Saratoga County

113th ASSEMBLY DISTRICT — Absentee ballot counting that starts next week in Saratoga and Washington counties will determine the final result in the 113th Assembly District race, in which incumbent Assemblywoman Carrie Woerner holds a 901-vote lead over challenger Dave Catalfamo.

The Saratoga County Board of Elections will start counting thousands of absentee ballots on Tuesday, in a process that is expected to take several days. The absentee count in Washington County will begin on Thursday.

There are 10,522 absentees from the 113th to be counted in Saratoga County, and Washington County has 2,567. Both those totals could rise slightly, since a few ballots may still come in by mail.

The Woerner-Catalfamo contest is the most closely contested Assembly race in the Capital Region, where incumbents were generally returned to office.

Based on in-person early and Election Day voting, Woerner, D-Round Lake, held a narrow 901-vote lead over Catalfamo of Wilton, a former aide to Gov. George Pataki and economic development official. Woener is seeking her fourth two-year term representing a district that includes eastern Saratoga County and western Washington County.

Overall, Woerner has 30,136 votes to Catlafamo’s 29,235. In-person results differed by county, with Woerner holding a 1,902 vote lead in Saratoga County, and Catalfamo having a 1,001-vote lead in Washington County.

The majority of the district’s active voters, 73,557, live in Saratoga County. (There was 22,305 active voters in the Washington County part of the district.) By voter enrollment, the district leans Republican.

Catalfamo had the Republican, Conservative and Upstate Jobs lines. Woerner had the Democrat, Independence and Service America Movement ballot lines.

Woerner said Friday she was “pretty confident” going into the absentee counting process. In general, more Democrats than Republicans have voted by absentee this year.

Catalfamo said he believes his campaign message, which focused heavily on public safety and criticism of Democratic measures like bail reform (which Woerner voted against), resonated with a lot of people, and he discounted the idea that people vote their party line.

“We don’t now how people vote based on voter registration, so let’s just get the votes counted,” he said.

The Democratic Assembly Campaign Committee put at least $130,000 into supporting Woerner’s campaign, which launched a heavy television advertising campaign in the final days before the election.

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