Schenectady

Broken AC sends Schenectady County Court virtual Friday afternoon

A broken air conditioner closed the Schenectady Couny Court House on State Street in Schenectady Friday, causing all afternoon proceedings to be conducted virtually.
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A broken air conditioner closed the Schenectady Couny Court House on State Street in Schenectady Friday, causing all afternoon proceedings to be conducted virtually.

Employees at the Schenectady County Courthouse were sent home to work remotely Friday after the building’s air conditioning unit stopped working on a day expected to feel anywhere from 95 to 105 degrees. 

“The chiller tripped sometime between close of business yesterday and when employees arrived this morning,” said Joanne Mann, deputy district executive for the 4th Judicial District, which oversees the courts in the county.

Forty court employees are assigned to the building, according to Mann.

Schenectady County Director of Communications Erin Roberts said the issue was fixed by 1:30 p.m. However, she did not elaborate as to what issue caused the unit to stop working. The county owns and operates the property. 

Mann said there were very few in person appearances scheduled Friday. Those scheduled for the morning were done in person, while those slated for the afternoon were conducted virtually.

Temperatures this week were in the upper 80s to lower 90s, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Dan Thompson.

However, National Grid issued advisories via email to customers during the week that there would be “high energy demand days,” and people should plan to limit their power usage at certain times of the day.

Overall, the grid has performed well, said Patrick Stella, a communications manager for National Grid. 

“We’ve seen some scattered outages here and there, but nothing of major concern at this point,” he said. 

Thompson said temperatures are expected to cool down over the next week to the upper 70 and lower 80s.

Categories: News, Schenectady County

One Comment

There’s no reason why the system can’t have a monitoring system to provide alerts in case there are failures or anomalies. What if it were the heating system in the dead of winter, leading to frozen and burst plumbing?

So a good journalist would ask, how much did this disruption cost the taxpayers, who is responsible and what’s being done to avoid it in the future? Or is this an acceptable way to do the people’s business?

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