Glenville

Glenville announces new grant program utilizing federal funds; Aerosciences Museum to seek funds

Empire State Aerospace Museum President Dan Wilson with a Harrier, a “jump jet”, from the early 1970’s in the hangar at the Gallery 1 building in Glenville Tuesday
PHOTOGRAPHER:

Empire State Aerospace Museum President Dan Wilson with a Harrier, a “jump jet”, from the early 1970’s in the hangar at the Gallery 1 building in Glenville Tuesday

GLENVILLE — Non-profits and small businesses in town that can show a revenue loss resulting from the pandemic are now eligible for a new grant program funded by the American Rescue Plan Act.

A pool of $150,000 will be used to help nonprofits in town, which may apply for the funding in increments up to $50,000, according to Town Supervisor Chris Koetzle.

The town’s small businesses will be eligible for up to $10,000 grants from the town Rescue Plan fund.

“This is just a way of helping small businesses try to recover some more with a grant, not a loan,” he said. 

The funding increments were outlined in agenda documents for Wednesday night’s town board meeting.

One local non-profit planning to seek some of that funding is the Empire State Aerosciences Museum which shut down for months during the pandemic. The museum had no school field trips, no regular admissions and no other events.

The shutdown hit the museum hard, said Joyce Newkirk, its treasurer and chief operating officer. 

“It had a negative impact on our finances,” she said, noting the museum saw its regular income drop a little over 50%. 

The museum relies heavily on admissions and memberships for its funding. Newkirk said while membership did increase after the Concord replica was placed on display, the interest did not make up for the hit the museum has taken during the pandemic. 

Koetzle said businesses and nonprofits will not only have to demonstrate the loss of revenue and the impact it had but also how a grant would help the business or nonprofit going forward. 

“The grant is not tied to job creation or retention,” Koetzle said.

Koetzle brought the funding opportunity to Newkirk’s attention.

“I think it’s wonderful,” she said. 

The museum, which has operated with a staff of almost all volunteers for 37 years, needs work. 

Fixing the leaky roof will cost $500,000 alone, said President Dan Wilson. In total, he said the facility needs $1.6 million worth of renovation work over the next three years. 

He and Newkirk want to be able to use the money for those repairs and to update its educational programs, including its summer Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics program. 

ARPA money would also be designated toward helping youth sports programs in town, Koetzle said. 

The organizations would provide financial information like registration fees and then also what capital projects the groups were unable to accomplish due to COVID and the town will consider funding those projects, he said.

Shenandoah Briere may be reached at [email protected]

Categories: News, Schenectady County, Scotia Glenville

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