Clifton Park

Citing supply chain concerns, Clifton Park OKs $1.3 million for six plow trucks

A DOT snowplow moves the remaining snow on Route 146 in Clifton Park Sunday afternoon after less than an inch of snow fell in the Capital Region earlier in the day. Feb. 7, 2021.
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A DOT snowplow moves the remaining snow on Route 146 in Clifton Park Sunday afternoon after less than an inch of snow fell in the Capital Region earlier in the day. Feb. 7, 2021.

CLIFTON PARK – In a move aimed at getting ahead of supply-chain issues associated with the global COVID-19 pandemic, the Town Board on Monday unanimously authorized Supervisor Philip Barrett to order six dump trucks with snow plows and spreaders for a combined $1.3 million.

Highway Superintendent Dahn Bull said advancing the request was one of the best things his department has done during his five-year tenure. 

“It’s going to take out some of the older, less effective equipment that we’re always worried is going to break down during a snowstorm,” Bull said.

The order will be placed with Navistar Inc. of Loudonville.

The vehicles’ arrival could be as distant as 2024, according to board documents.

Bull said the turnaround for receiving the trucks will be at least 18 months.

The 12- to 18-month lead time needed for acquiring the trucks is due to federal policies and related supply chain disruptions.

New York State allows municipalities to “piggyback” onto competitively bid contracts of other communities in the state, as long as the bid process from the original contracting entity was conducted through a sealed bid process.

Clifton Park’s $1,383,040 order uses the piggyback option from a 2018 contract for Onondaga County, whose bids were opened in June 2018, with prices valid through June 2023, according to bid documents and correspondence reviewed from the Onondaga County Division of Purchase.

Five of the vehicles are single-axle development plow trucks at a cost of $1.1 million, with the sixth vehicle a tandem 10-wheel dump truck with a plow package, for $241,564.

 

Bull said the trucks will be California “green” certified, with an additional system that cleans their exhausts to improve the air quality.

Bull also explained the process of constructing the trucks. Their engines are built in Jamestown and shipped to Michigan to build the trucks. When the chassis are finished they’re sent to Watertown to fabricate the plows.

The trucks will have two stage plows that collect more snow and ice, cutting down on the amount of salt needed on roadways.

The town is also having thicker proprietor blades installed so that they last longer, the superintendent said.

The six trucks will replace four of the town’s oldest vehicles, Bull said. The town has 24 plow routes and 25 trucks, and Bull said he would like for the town to eventually replace a truck per year.

Barrett, the supervisor, said: “It’s good to get orders in early and often as you’re never quite sure what supply chain issues will look like in the next year.”

He noted that a product called neon that’s used by chip makers is largely built in Ukraine, which could present another set of supply chain issues for cars and trucks.

Contact reporter Brian Lee at [email protected] or 518-419-9766.

 

Categories: Clifton Park and Halfmoon, Saratoga County

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