Halfmoon

Other One is the newest kid on the craft brewery block

Matt Stillitano, left, and Randy Lewis behind the bar at Other One Brewing Company in Halfmoon. Right, a sampler flight of four of the seven beers on tap. (Joanne E. McFadden)
PHOTOGRAPHER:

Matt Stillitano, left, and Randy Lewis behind the bar at Other One Brewing Company in Halfmoon. Right, a sampler flight of four of the seven beers on tap. (Joanne E. McFadden)

By Joanne E. McFadden

If you want to stay really close to home and enjoy a craft beer, you can check out one of the Capital Region’s newest microbreweries, Other One Brewing Company in Halfmoon.

The establishment had its genesis when a group of neighbors got together and started brewing. Clifton Park resident Randy Lewis had been home brewing on and off for 30 years and even owned a home brew beer supply store in Troy in the 1990s. His son talked him into home brewing again, which piqued his neighbors’ interest. “In the neighborhood, when one or two guys does a project, everybody comes out,” Lewis said.

Soon, Lewis started brewing with neighbors Matt Stillitano, Peter LaPan and Brian Hutchinson in Hutchinson’s garage. “We all got together, and one thing led to another,” Lewis said.

When there was a storefront available in Glennpeter Plaza on Route 9, the four decided to take the leap from home brewers to microbrewery owners, and they opened Other One Brewing earlier this spring.

So far, the group has created nine different beers for their new brewery, including three NEIPAs (New England IPAs), a stout, a red ale, a hefeweizen, and an American ale that is the number one seller so far.

Lewis is the head brewer, using an on-premises two-barrel brewing system with three 62-gallon fermenters that brew 200 gallons of beer at a time. They keep seven on tap.

Lewis himself visits many local taprooms and brewpubs keeping an eye open for flavor inspiration, and he listens to what customers request as well.

Some of the beers are brewed with local grains, and the brewery is working on obtaining its farm brewery license. Some of the beers’ names are inspired by partners’ daughters, or granddaughters, such as the “Sajulus (Rhymes with Fabulous),” which got its name from Lewis’ daughter, who couldn’t say the word “fabulous” when she was 3.

On its second Saturday open, the establishment was packed with people who seemed enthusiastic about having a microbrewery in the neighborhood.

“I think we’re in the right place at the right time,” Lewis said as he surveyed the bustling taproom.

Categories: Food, Life and Arts

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