Fall Home 2022: Wilton family gets ‘closer to all this’ with move to Saratoga County (with 13 photos)

The home of Bethany and Jamil Khan on Parkhurst Road in Wilton; Bethany and Jamil Khan, and their children Natalie, 3, and Christopher, 7 months
PHOTOGRAPHER:
The home of Bethany and Jamil Khan on Parkhurst Road in Wilton; Bethany and Jamil Khan, and their children Natalie, 3, and Christopher, 7 months

WILTON After living in New York City for a decade, Bethany Bowyer Khan was craving a more bucolic setting.

“I missed the dirt in my hands when I was in the city. I needed to get back closer to all this,” Khan said from her spacious Greek Revival home in Wilton, which she and her family moved into last year.

Khan worked in commercial real estate and was a project manager at RXR Realty when the pandemic hit.

Quarantining in a Brooklyn apartment with her husband, Jamil, their young daughter, Natalie, and their dog proved to be too much, so the family fled to Khan’s childhood home in Ohio, which sits on 40 acres and has been in Bethany’s family for five generations.

After several months there they began the search for a more permanent home. They found the ideal spot in Saratoga County.

“We felt like there was enough happening and going on here, that it was a big enough community, that we wouldn’t feel like we were completely leaving the city and living in the middle of nowhere,” Khan said.

Most of the homes they looked at were older properties and farmhouses, which needed work. But when they came across the Greek Revival-style home in Wilton, which was just 11 years old but had the design features of an older home, it seemed like a perfect fit.

“There is just an incredible amount of design, both on the exterior and the interior of the house, that speaks to the Greek Revival architectural movement, and I had a huge appreciation for that,” Khan said.

Inside there are more traditional design elements such as transom windows and quarter-sawn oak flooring.

“It’s the best of both worlds, with me being an old-house lover but having young kids,” Khan said.

Photos (13)

Bethany and Jamil Khan, and their children Natalie, 3, and Christopher, 7 months, at their home ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Home of Bethany and Jamil Khan ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE
Bethany and Jamil Khan, and their children Natalie, 3, and Christopher, 7 months, at their home ERICA MILLER/THE DAILY GAZETTE

The couple closed on the house in November 2020 and moved in the following January in the midst of a major kitchen renovation. Khan, who had since left her position at RXR, designed and oversaw the project.

“The kitchen is really the heart and soul of the home. We put a lot of value here on cooking and baking, and using family recipes and cooking seasonally and organically,” Khan said. “We have the stool that we keep out at the island for my daughter, Natalie. We tried at a very young age to just engage her in that process. So it was really important that the kitchen gets done.”

It was a rewarding process for Khan, finding pieces that were locally sourced along with a few from farther afield. To stay true to Greek Revival style, the kitchen countertops feature a different finish from the perimeter and the island.

“That just ties into this whole Greek Revival story and narrative with the passage of time,” Khan said. “These homes were built and handed down from one generation to the next, and so additions were usually put on. The design really being timeless inside [and] not too matchy-matchy was integral to that whole process.”

In the living room, Khan added white built-in bookcases on either side of the dark blue-gray fireplace mantel. She and her husband also painted and did all the molding work on one of the main bedrooms.

“You’d find me up really late at night … on the ladder, with caulking all up my arm, trying to finish this molding work and paintwork by flashlight in the evenings after our daughter went to bed,” Khan said.

More Fall Home 2022: Innovation, Preservation, Restoration, Inspiration

She documented some of the projects through her Instagram account. But when she was several months pregnant with her second child, Christopher, she also launched Arcadian Revival (@arcadianrevival) on Instagram, where she quickly gained a following with posts on her design process and thoughts on sustainable living.

Sustainability has long been a focus for Khan. She studied urban planning and public administration at Miami University in Ohio, and worked in the private and public sectors.

“I started off in local government, focused on economic development and then that quickly translated to a focus on sustainability because I cared very much about the environment,” Khan said.

She and her husband, whose career is focused on renewable energy, met while working for the Department of Environmental Protection.

With Arcadian Revival, she’s spotlighting ways to introduce more sustainable practices into everyday life as well as in larger renovation projects. She’s also starting to take on other home design projects in the area.

Khan’s design philosophy boils down to three things.

“When I think about renovating houses or doing real estate work or design, it somehow needs to fit into one of these three buckets: the design itself needs to have some type of inspiration from nature and different natural materials; or the materials or the items used have to be sustainable themselves; or it has to be something that already exists, whether it’s an old house or an antique,” Khan said.

That philosophy is easy to spot in her home decor, which incorporates antiques and newer pieces to create a timeless aesthetic. It also plays into a gallery wall Khan recently began working on.

“During 2020, I spent a lot of time in my family’s attic, and found a bunch of old portraits and pieces of artwork that had just been collecting dust for, some of them, well over 100 years. I busted some of those out of the attic and brought them from Ohio to upstate New York,” Khan said.

Those will be mixed in with pieces she’s found at flea markets and local antique shops.

While Khan’s main focus is on raising her young children, in the coming months she plans to create a website for Arcadian Revival and continue to grow the platform.

“Opportunities just keep popping up,” Khan said. “I’m slowly just taking on maybe one or a couple of projects at a time, depending on what the project is.”

What’s in a name?
The term “Arcadia” in Bethany Bowyer Khan’s @arcadianrevival on Instagram refers to a vision of pastoralism and harmony with nature.

More Fall Home 2022: Innovation, Preservation, Restoration, Inspiration

Categories: Fall Home 2022, Life and Arts, Saratoga Springs

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