Schenectady County

‘They were building a great life’: Victims in Princetown murder remembered

Paul Drago, left, of Schenectady, and Billy Sise of Princetown attend a candlelight prayer vigil Friday for Alesia Wadsworth and William Horwedel, who were killed Tuesday inside their Reynolds Road home in at Princetown. The vigil was held at Princetown Town Hall. 
PHOTOGRAPHER:

Paul Drago, left, of Schenectady, and Billy Sise of Princetown attend a candlelight prayer vigil Friday for Alesia Wadsworth and William Horwedel, who were killed Tuesday inside their Reynolds Road home in at Princetown. The vigil was held at Princetown Town Hall. 

PRINCETOWN — Days after Alesia Wadsworth and William Horwedel were murdered inside their Reynolds Road home, more than 100 gathered for a candlelight prayer vigil to remember the couple.

Among those in attendance was Alesia Wadsworth’s brother, Tim Wadsworth, who traveled from his Northville home to attend the ceremony along with his wife and daughter and extended members of the Wadsworth family.

“She was great,” Tim Wadsworth said. “We grew up together and it was great. We did a lot together.”

Alesia Wadsworth, 60, was one of six children, who worked as a nurse at St. Mary’s Hospital in Amsterdam. She loved skiing, golf and jigsaw puzzles, and would frequently travel to Turning Stone Casino in Central New York to play BINGO, her family recalled. 

She had been with Horwedel, 61, for around 15 years, who members of the Wadsworth family described as a hard worker and a loving father of triplets and grandfather of five who wouldn’t hesitate to drop everything to babysit. 

Two of Horwedel’s children went on to be state police officers with the local Troop G. A third worked construction alongside their father, Tim Wadsworth said. 

Alesia Wadsworth and Horwedel lived together in a house at 1155 Reynolds Road that Horwedel built by hand, according to Patti Wadsworth, Alesia’s sister-in-law and friend for more than 30 years. 

“They were building a great life to enjoy their golden years,” she said, fighting back tears. “It was taken.”

Police on Tuesday discovered the couple shot dead inside their home around noon after being called to conduct a welfare check after one of the victims did not show up for work that day.  

Police have since charged Alesia Wadsworth’s 19-year-old son, Nicholas Fiebka, with two counts of second-degree murder. The 2021 Schalmont High School graduate was arraigned early Wednesday and was sent to Schenectady County Jail without bail. He is due back in court Monday. 

A motive for the killings is unclear, but Tim and Patti Wadsworth said Fiebka was a “troubled kid” who had threatened the couple multiple times over the past five years, adding Alesia Wadsworth was forced to acquire an order of protection earlier this year.  

“They were scared to death but didn’t think he would do it,” Tim Wadsworth said. 

He added that his sister always supported Fiebka, and that Horwedel acted like a father, but the couple was forced to kick him out of their home earlier this year. 

He eventually relocated to an apartment complex on Union Avenue, across from Union College, according to police. 

“She did everything for him,” Tim Wadsworth said. “That’s all she wanted was a child. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out.”

News of the killings came as a shock to the community. A year ago, a similar tragedy took place in neighboring Duanesburg. 

In that case, Nelson D. Patino, 47, was indicted last year for allegely murdering of his wife, Sor Alexandra Bustamante Gomez, and 5-year-old son Jacob Patino, at their home on 6826 Duanesburg Road on Dec. 1, 2021. His case remains pending.

Several who gathered Friday were seen wiping tears and embracing, while others stood quietly and listened as the Rev. Tony Solomon from the Duanesburg-Florida Baptist Church recited prayers.

Paul Drago, the owner of the 19th Hole Cafe in Duanesburg, was among those who gathered.

Alesia Wadsworth and Horwedel were frequent customers, who Drago described as kind-hearted who kept mostly to themselves. 

“They were great loving people,” he said.  

But Lyndsey Wadsworth recalled her aunt as fiercely competitive and an adamant BINGO player and lover of jigsaw puzzles.

She recalled how Alesia would buy two of the same puzzles so they could race to see who could finish first. 

Alesia was also there to provide guidance and financial support when necessary, Lyndsey Wadsworth recalled.

“She helped me out a lot financially. I think she did all that just so we can go to BINGO and spend all my savings that she taught me to save,” she said with a laugh. “Those were good memories.”  

Contact reporter Chad Arnold at: [email protected] 

Categories: News, News, Schenectady County

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