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Pizza King owner Camaj linked to incidents at Buddhist residence

Pizza King owner Camaj linked to incidents at Buddhist residence

The well known owner of Pizza King on Jay Street, Jon Camaj, was charged with criminal impersonation

The well known owner of Pizza King on Jay Street, Jon Camaj, was charged with criminal impersonation in the second degree by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Friday, accused of posing as a police officer.

During an argument outside a Chinese Buddhists' Western Shrine in Auriesville, Camaj identified himself as Montgomery County Sheriff's Investigator Barry Serpa, according to Serpa on Saturday.

The incident followed a series of events last week, beginning Tuesday when a roadblock was put up at the Buddhist property in Auriesville. The driveway where people enter the residence was blocked with twine, road signs and debris, including broken glass and a small statue of a chef carrying a pizza.

On Thursday, Camaj, of Albany, was charged with trespassing in connection with the roadblock. Later that day, he returned to the property and blocked the driveway with his car, according to residents of the property.

Joshua Rosenstein, 24, of Clifton Park, who was trying to leave via the driveway, said that Camaj presented Serpa's business card when he was asked for identification and that he claimed to be affiliated with the sheriff's department.

Camaj was arraigned on Friday and sent to jail on $500 cash bail, which was posted that day and he was released. He is scheduled to reappear in the Town of Glen court to answer charges.

Due to what appears to be Camaj’s ongoing issues with the Buddhists, Serpa said, a stay away order of protection was also issued that bars Camaj from going on the Buddhist property in Auriesville.

The Pizza King is a popular restaurant that moved to Jay Street in 2008 from its original home on State Street, when the Schenectady Metroplex Development Authority offered incentives for them to move, to allow development at the original site.

During the 20 years he spent building up his restaurant, Camaj became recognizable in the community and has scores of patrons.

Efforts to reach Camaj at his store on Saturday night were unsuccessful and one worker had no comment.

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