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Man's death during gym outburst blamed on steroids, not Taser use

Man's death during gym outburst blamed on steroids, not Taser use

A Troy man who struggled with police officers at a Colonie gym died from a medical condition, not fr

A Troy man who struggled with police officers at a Colonie gym died from a medical condition, not from being shocked repeatedly with Tasers, an investigation has found.

Albany County District Attorney P. David Soares announced the results of the investigation Thursday evening in a news release.

Medical reports also indicated that 32-year-old Chad L. Brothers was also under the influence of “life-threatening substances,” the release reads.

A spokeswoman for Soares later confirmed those substances included steroids and the hallucinogen PCP.

“It has been determined that [police] acted appropriately and professionally under the circumstances and therefore no criminal liability exists,” the release reads.

Brothers died Oct. 31 after struggling with officers at Gold’s Gym on Troy-Schenectady Road in Latham.

The struggle ensued, police said, after Brothers assaulted another patron and overturned several pieces of heavy gym equipment.

Brothers refused commands from the first officer on the scene. He was ultimately stunned by three officers using their Taser devices. At one point, he lifted an officer off the ground.

When Brothers was finally in handcuffs, officers realized he wasn’t breathing. They started CPR and called for paramedics. Brothers was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest soon afterward at Albany Medical Center, police have said.

Representatives of the Colonie Police Department could not be reached for comment Thursday evening.

The exact cause of Brothers’ death was cited as a condition called “agitated delirium,” the result of a sudden rise in body temperature. Police apparently cited the same condition as a possibility in the case at an October news conference held following the incident, though they referred to it as “excited delirium.”

The “life threatening substances likely contributed to his behavior,” the release reads.

“Part of our review involved discussions with Mr. Brothers’ family and from all of the information that we have received, his behavior on that morning was tragically out of character,” Soares said.

Brothers‘ death came less than two weeks after the New York Civil Liberties Union released a report on electroshock weapon use in the region, concluding they were being consistently misused, with as many as 60 percent of the studied incidents not meeting the recommended criteria for justified use.

Four departments were included in the study, but Colonie was not one of them. The departments were chosen to represent a cross-section of department sizes, officials said.

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