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Letters to the Editor
What you need to know for 01/16/2017

Column skated over practical problems of going all-green

Column skated over practical problems of going all-green

*Column skated over practical problems of going all-green *Stop playing politics, start solving prob

Column skated over practical problems of going all-green

After reading the May 12 op-ed column by Karen Cookson, “Accentuating the Positive,” which praised a study saying New York state should go to total green energy, I would like to provide the following comments.

The study calls for all buildings to be heated by electricity. It never mentions who will wind up paying for the conversion of existing gas and oil heating systems to electric. In addition, the study calls for all new home construction starting in the year 2020 to use electricity for heating. Since my home is heated by gas, I wish Karen would have provided some recommendations as to who is going to pay for the conversion of all these homes.

The study calls for the elimination of all engines requiring petroleum products in New York state. While I think I could live with having an electric car, I would hope they extend the range so I can drive to some other state to fly out to Las Vegas. Karen didn’t seem to have any problem with eliminating air travel in New York state.

The study does allow the use of wood for heating up to the year 2050. After that, it would be banned. Karen didn’t have any comments concerning the use of wood for pizza ovens or for fireplaces being used for holiday gatherings.

The study calls for 12,700 wind turbines to be built off-shore along Long Island, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. I would certainly agree with the late [Sen.] Ted Kennedy that the sight of 10,000 wind turbines crammed into 50 miles of Long Island shoreline would definitely be an eyesore. Apparently, Karen is not concerned about this issue because it is not in her back yard.

Finally, the study states that there will be a 32 percent reduction in electrical consumption by going all-electric. Unfortunately, the study the authors referenced was written by the authors themselves and I was not able to retrieve it online. While Karen accepted this reduction, I would want to consider it long and hard before I found out that we actually needed 30,000 wind turbines off the Long Island shore.

In summary, I wish Karen would have been a little bit more critical of the study instead of accepting it completely because it justifies her anti-fracking and anti-pipeline position.

Andy Beiniks

Charlton

Stop playing politics, start solving problems

Am I the only one tired of all of these accusations about our president? Am I the only one tired of the Republican Party fighting with the Democratic Party? Am I the only one who feels our elected officials forget who they are working for and focus their attention on more important national crisis?

The hatred shown our president by many Republicans and even some Democrats is just plainly unacceptable.

It is all about politics! Politics have taken this Benghazi tragedy too far. The mass murder of 21 children and some adults became a political campaign. I do not understand how elected officials can feel they represent us by banging heads instead of working together for the common goal of the people they represent. I do not feel that everything said or done is in agreement with the different parties, but work it out.

Don’t we have big enough problems like North Korea, financial instability, one out of five children in the United States hungry, the bombing of one of our biggest cities, rebuilding of disaster areas in the United States. I could go on and on with things we feel are important to us, the people.

Yet we, too, go ahead and re-elect officials that have been there too long and have become career politicians, forgetting the real reason they are there in the first place. Election time is not too far away. We have to come together, as we have in the past, and elect officials who are more focused on the problems than who is in the presidency and how to get that person shunned or out of office.

I am tired of politics in America, isn’t anyone else? We have to do what most of our elected officials are not doing — that is, thinking of all the things Americans need and want to keep this country strong and powerful.

If our elected officials cannot come together, we can. The only time this can happen is at election time. Use your vote to get our country back on track for the people!

Vincent F. Carelli

Amsterdam

Jerusalem’s ‘unity’ does not extend to non-Jews

On May 22 a large coalition of Jewish groups will hold their fourth annual Unity Celebration of Jerusalem in Schenectady. They are celebrating the 1967 Israeli conquest and reunification of East Jerusalem while quietly condoning, ignoring or applauding the considerable ongoing Israeli ethnic cleansing of Palestinians from Jerusalem.

A 2011 U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs for the occupied Palestinian territories report, titled “East Jerusalem: Key Humanitarian Concerns,” said about 14,000 Palestinians have had their East Jerusalem residency revoked since 1967, including 4,500 in 2008; during the past 20 years, Israeli authorities have made it increasingly difficult or impossible for West Bank Palestinians to work in and visit East Jerusalem for medical care, to attend school, or visit religious sites; Israeli settler organizations have targeted land and property to create an inner layer of Israeli settlements within Palestinian residential areas, resulting in restrictions for Palestinians on the use of public space, residential growth, and freedom of movement.

Event creator Rabbi Yaakov Kellman of the Jewish Educational Resources of NY (JERNY) had a May Times Union article prior to the first Unity Celebration in which he said: “Jerusalem will only realize its potential so long as it remains within the full, exclusive control of the state of Israel.” .

The U.N. report said the 1967 Israeli annexation and vast enlargement of East Jerusalem “is not recognized by the international community” and Jerusalem has historically been the political, economic, religious, medical, and social center for Palestinians.

Jewish access to Jerusalem does not have to come with denied and restricted Palestinian, Arab and Muslim access. A genuine Jerusalem Unity Celebration would be one in which every one participates.

Tom Ellis

Albany

Hard to donate food if postman comes early

A brief comment related to Larry Lewis’s May 16 letter (“Better support needed for annual postal food drive”).

As our block is at the end of a long route, our mail arrives between 4 and 6 p.m., six days a week. In preparation for the food drive, my wife and I had put sauce, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, and a box of rotini into the bag provided and set it by the front door.

On Saturday, after writing some checks, I went to put out the mail and the bag at 1:30 p.m. Imagine my surprise to find that my mail had already been delivered. (Can’t recall the last time it had arrived before 4 p.m.) So, not only did my outgoing mail have to wait until Monday, but a full bag of food was returned to my pantry.

I will continue to support the City Mission to make sure that those in need are fed, but perhaps I’m not the only one who intended to contribute to the postal drive, but was denied the opportunity.

Tom Della Sala

Schenectady

Don’t worry about trash scavengers, welcome them

I could not resist responding to your May 16 article on trash scavengers in Glenville.

Personally, I think everyone should be happy if someone has a use for something you are throwing away.

The town must save some money by not having it collected. The trash collector has a reduced workload, the dump has less trash and someone has a use for something you want to get rid of.

It is an absolute win for everyone. Personally, I always hope someone finds a use for what I throw out. I welcome the scavengers.

Bernard Murphy

Scotia

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