Subscriber login

News
What you need to know for 04/26/2017

Locals have left their mark on new Amsterdam labyrinth

Locals have left their mark on new Amsterdam labyrinth

Residents in and around Amsterdam can get acquainted with a new addition to the south lawn at City H
Locals have left their mark on new Amsterdam labyrinth
Shane Hoefs, a custodian at the Amsterdam City Hall, mows the lawn in an area called the labyrinth, on the grounds at city hall.
Photographer: Marc Schultz

Residents in and around Amsterdam can get acquainted with a new addition to the south lawn at City Hall on Saturday — a labyrinth of stone that’s continually changing with the help of residents and artists adding some personality to the creation.

Since she created the labyrinth in July, Amsterdam resident Gina Mintzer said some of its hundreds of stones have disappeared, only to be replaced with new ones.

Some are painted bright colors, one includes a lucky shamrock, one has a quote from the Bible and another has a note painted on it saying “Be Blessed.”

As the project progressed, Mintzer said she and friends realized the massive stone wall alongside City Hall could use some color, so the group of volunteers has been busy gathering plants and digging up weeds to turn it into a peace garden.

Mintzer said she garnered the assistance of Jeremy Spraggs of Gloversville. He developed a labyrinth himself and guided the new creation’s development.

The project drew the support and assistance of several entities, including the youth programs from the Amsterdam YMCA and the city’s Creative Connections Arts Center.

Mintzer said both the labyrinth and garden are aimed at providing people something more than the standard local government offerings at City Hall.

“It’s to bring peace and healing,” she said.

The Amsterdam-based St. Mary’s Healthcare makes use of a labyrinth as part of its Complementary Therapies program. The hospital on its website describes the labyrinth as a form of walking meditation. It’s considered an effective tool for people seeking a “grounded and imaginative spiritual journey toward deeper self-knowledge.”

Mintzer said for her, the project is a way of leaving a legacy.

A dedication ceremony planned for 7 p.m. Saturday will include bagpipe music, remarks from those involved in the creation, a drum circle and a ceremonial walk through the labyrinth.

The labyrinth is open to the public daily. It can be reached via the lower parking lot at City Hall at 61 Church St.

View Comments
Hide Comments
You have 0 articles 1 articles 2 articles 3 articles 4 articles 5 articles 6 articles 7 articles remaining of Daily Gazette free premium content.

You have reached your monthly premium content limit.

Continue to enjoy Daily Gazette premium content by becoming a subscriber.
Already a subscriber? Log In