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Five candidates in running to become Schenectady’s fourth judge

Five candidates in running to become Schenectady’s fourth judge

There are five candidates in the running for a vacant Schenectady City Court judge seat, a position

There are five candidates in the running for a vacant Schenectady City Court judge seat, a position Mayor Gary McCarthy is looking to fill in a month or so.

The new judge would replace former City Court Judge Matt Sypniewski, who was elected as County Court judge in November.

McCarthy said he is interviewing Kate McGuirl, Rotterdam’s town attorney; Teneka Frost-Amusa, associate counsel for the state Department of State; Mark Caruso, Schenectady County’s public defender; Diane Herrmann, administrative law judge for the state Justice Center for the Protection of People With Special Needs; and attorney Andrew Healey.

McCarthy said he plans to appoint a new judge in the next four to six weeks. The new judge would join the city’s current three judges: Guido Loyola, Mark Blanchfield and Robert Hoffman.

“The court is a little short-staffed, but they seem to be getting by,” he said.

A fourth judge, who would be serving a 10-year term, could create some space issues, though.

City officials previously toured alternative space to house four courtrooms. Top contenders were the upper floor of The Daily Gazette building at 2345 Maxon Road Extension and Center City at 433 State St.

It appears McCarthy found an alternative — but temporary — plan, which would save the city money in the short-term.

McCarthy said he is looking at options to reconfigure space in City Hall, rather than moving to another location.

“There seems to be the possibility of an interim solution as opposed to a new facility or moving all of the courts to another location, like The Gazette or Center City,” McCarthy said. “That seems to meet Office of Court Administration criteria.”

Schenectady’s increase from three full-time posts to four full-time posts took effect Jan. 1 as part of statewide legislation targeting busy jurisdictions.

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