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Too early to remove dredging equipment

Too early to remove dredging equipment

*Too early to remove dredging equipment *Some immigrants are threat to country *Clerk has no right t

Too early to remove dredging equipment

The Schuylerville Area Chamber of Commerce represents many businesses in the very heart of the now long-running and controversial Hudson River dredging project.

While many of our members retain a mixture of feelings about the project, the current plan to begin the disassembly of dredging equipment before studies are completed on the adjacent riverfront flood plain areas strikes most as shortsighted in the extreme.

We urge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric Co. to postpone any important equipment removals until after these studies have been completed.

The project has been too long in play, with much accomplished, not to finish the work as originally comprehended by the people who live, work and play along the upper Hudson River.

David W. Roberts

Schuylerville

The writer is president of the Schuylerville Area Chamber of Commerce.

Some immigrants are threat to country

What's wrong with this picture? Essentially, the pope's message is: America, don't believe what your eyes and ears tell you. Do as I say, not as I do.

Pay no attention to the beheadings, crucifixions, genocide, oppression of women, suicide bombings, car bombings, subway bombings and the general tenets of the Qurn. Welcome these military-age Islamic men into your country with open arms -- like the lunatics in Europe.

Nevermind the 20-year terrorist history of the religion of peace. Pay no attention to these people's avowed intent to destroy western civilization and subjugate the world to their sick beliefs.

Wake up America. We don't need this type of people here, contrary to Obama's intent.

Mike Blyskal

Ballston Spa

Clerk has no right to force religion on us

The religious right has all but conferred sainthood on Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Davis is viewed as a modern-day religious martyr in her struggle to defy the dictates of a godless, oppressive government.

Would religious conservatives have been equally outraged if Davis was an anti-war Buddhist who denied marriage licenses to military personnel -- individuals obligated to kill on command? What if she was a member of the Church of Euthanasia, an organization that believes the world is overpopulated and has but a single commandment: "Thou shall not procreate." (One of the church's slogans is "Save the planet, kill yourself.")

Would Davis' insistence that people requesting a marriage license take a pledge stating they will not have children be tolerated as an expression of her religious freedom?

Some have compared Kim Davis to Rosa Parks, whose refusal to relinquish her seat on a bus to a white passenger in 1955 triggered the Montgomery bus boycott, a significant event in the civil rights movement. As columnist Bill Press stated, while Parks was attempting to expand constitutionally mandated rights to blacks, Davis is acting to deny newly enacted legal rights to individuals whose lawful behavior does not conform to her religious views.

The marriage license fiasco in Kentucky has nothing to do with religious freedom. To the contrary, it is an exercise in religious tyranny. What Davis and her supporters are saying is disturbingly clear: "My religious beliefs are more important than yours, and you must behave in accordance with my beliefs whether you agree with them or not."

A fundamental aspect of religious freedom in this country is the freedom not to believe in another persons's god, or be subject to the values and rules of another's religion.

George J. Bryjak

Bloomingdale

Safford will fill void in Spa leadership

Saratoga Springs' middle class is ill-served by the leadership vacuum in the City Council, especially Mayor Joanne Yepsen.

Indecision, delay, bureaucracy and procedural ping-pong between politicians, city employees, boards and pushy special-interest groups have become the everyday norm in Saratoga Springs. This political quagmire weakens the city and makes it more difficult for our local small-business people to succeed and less likely that our children will be able to find good jobs locally and be able to stay here.

We need leadership from the mayor's office to make decisions and improve city services without raising taxes. Great projects, new ideas, a solid base of employment and success by the middle class are tomorrow's answer.

Mayor Yepsen refuses to protect the real middle class; the ones with rising taxes and costs while household income is falling. Mayor Yepsen loves political confusion, where there is always another meeting, committee, delay, event and special-interest constituency to placate.

Our city needs a leader who will get behind the middle class. We have that leader in John Safford, a veteran and small-business owner, who is running for mayor. Join me in voting for John to protect our middle class and our city.

Greg Wrobel

Saratoga Springs

U.S. departing from its original purpose

The Sept. 23 Gazette Opinion page is remarkable. In the "cartoon" regarding Ben Carson's comments about a Muslim president, it is implied that we should passively allow the country to be taken by Muslims.

The United States was established as a republic by northern European Protestants, by conflict. In 200 years of devolution -- including a civil war and many external wars -- we are now a failing democracy.

Using the Supreme Court as a measure, the country is now six-ninths Catholic and three-ninths Jewish. Using its president as a measure, we are now half-black. We are led by a man who acts full-black and gets the affirmative-action advantages of full-black.

His father was a Muslim, he was raised a Muslim, he often favors the Muslims. However, he says he is a Christian. And although he is also a politician and politicians routinely lie if it helps their cause, we are required to believe he is a Christian.

The writer of the first letter to the editor that day [Trump showed true colors during debate] finds evil and no possible good in the current leading Republican candidate for president.

Did you read beyond the clever headline, "GOP candidates: Fascists or fools, or both?" before choosing to publish the screed of a fascist fool, the "nationally syndicated columnist?"

Good grief.

Clyde Maughan

Rotterdam

Grateful for help on community march

I write on behalf of the clergy, the churches and the people of our Hamilton Hill community to express our thank you to all who helped to make our 10th annual March Schenectady for Jesus a success.

Our march began and ended at the Jerry Burrell Park in the Hamilton Hill community of Schenectady. We walked in the neighborhood and back to the park. Our live music and messages were heard throughout the route. Food and water were provided to all at the park for a time of continued fellowship.

A special thank you to Mayor Gary McCarthy and Police Chief Brian Kilcullen for their words addressing the crowd before the march began. Thank you to the police officer who escorted us during the march, to the city parks office for responding to our needs at the park, to the neighborhood watch volunteers and to Fred and Darlene Lee for their help at the park. Thank you to all who contributed in any way to a successful day.

The 11th annual March Schenectady for Jesus is scheduled for Saturday, July 30, 2016, at Jerry Burrell Park. Please join us next year as we continue to lift high the name of Jesus for the people and the city of Schenectady.

Barbara Heise

Schenectady

Writer is correct that Trump is a buffoon

Re Sept. 23 letter, "Trump showed true colors during debate": Kudos to Vince Dacquisto.

Finally, someone else has recognized the buffoon for what he is. Trump is exactly what Mr. Dacquisto describes so aptly in his letter.

Norrine Thompson

Niskayuna

Election Letters

The Gazette welcomes letters to the editor from readers on the upcoming election.

Letters should be short -- about 200 words. Longer letters might be published online only. We will not publish letters from candidates or from organized letter-writing campaigns.

The deadline for letters related to the Nov. 3 general election is 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23.

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