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Fireworks users still being inconsiderate

Fireworks users still being inconsiderate

*Fireworks users still being inconsiderate *Respect contributions all Americans make *What exactly d

Fireworks users still being inconsiderate

One year ago, I wrote a letter to the editor voicing my concern about neighborhood fireworks, specifically how it was affecting my dog, as well as countless others, I’m sure.

This year, my beloved dog is no longer with us, but I still feel the need to express my disappointment, once again, in my neighborhood. As I was getting ready for bed on July 3, it sounded like I lived on a race track and all of the cars on it were back-firing. My husband and I wondered why/how this loud “boom” sound attracts so many people.

It’s one thing to go to Jumpin’ Jacks, or the Empire State Plaza, to see a live, professional show whereby there are loud “booms." But they are accompanied with a stunning light show with beautiful colors and, most importantly, are held away from residential homes. I just don’t get why people enjoy setting off a loud, car back-firing noise just for the sake of saying they had fireworks. It’s not a fireworks display — it’s an annoyance — a loud, unneeded aggravation.

I will say, however, the loud explosions seemed to end around 11 p.m., for which I was grateful.

I really do miss my dog, but am thankful she did not have to suffer again for four straight days of inconsiderate behavior from our neighbors.

I’m sure next year me, or someone else, will be writing again to try and get the point across that fireworks should be left to the professionals, not an average Joe who just likes to hear loud noises.

Kathy Adach

Rotterdam

Respect contributions all Americans make

Whether we realize it or not, whether we want to admit it or not, America, the country, was built by immigrants from all over the world who came looking for a better life. Some were brought here by force and many of their descendants are still searching for that better life.

Today a number of children and grandchildren of those same immigrants have devolved into practitioners of bigotry, religious intolerance, xenophobia and homophobia. That’s a shame and I am sure their ancestors must be turning in their graves.

We tend to pretend God created America for older conservative white Europeans males and that the original Indians found on the land were caretakers waiting for the rightful owners to come and claim what had been sitting there waiting for them for millions of years. How convenient.

“Take back our country,” “America: Love it or leave it,” and “Make America great again” are a few of the slogans being thrown around, mostly by a population of older white, blue-collared, middle-class voters.

Of course, those Americans are important to the country, to its growth and welfare. But they should realize that many darker looking, hard-working, blue-collar Americans who came here at the same time as they did and even earlier, many new immigrants from other nations, are important to America, too.

We all have a stake here and are all important to this country. This is our country, the country of us all.

Donald Trump has managed to harness the festering hatred and negative energy of our troubled times and has morphed it into a Trojan horse he believes will carry him into the White House.

I pray every intelligent and thoughtful voter will see through his game and discard his message of hate and division. I hope the Americans I lived with for 50 years, loved and served well won’t fall for his message of bigotry and that they resist the urge to lash out at the poorest and most defenseless amongst us.

It would be a horrible thing for this country of immigrants, which until now has been a shining example of what the entire world should strive to be like.

God bless America. Land of us all.

Roger Malebranche

Broadalbin

What exactly defines affordable housing?

The June 22 Gazette article [“Schenectady’s former DSS building to become apartments”] announces that the Galesi Group is purchasing the DSS building on Nott Street. The company will rehabilitate it into 15 rental units that will be affordable to those with incomes of from $69,600 for a one-person household to $99,200 for a family of four.

It was interesting to note that the Schenectady Land Bank was providing $300,000 to the project for affordability sake. DSS and Section 8 programs identify rental housing affordability at 30 percent of income, which includes utilities. Hopefully, the Galesi Group will serve to install solar and photovoltaics for affordable heating and electricity (which should calculate to less than $120 per month for utilities).

So, in point of fact, the single person at 30 percent of income would be able to afford $1,740 per month for rent and utilities. I ask you, is affordable housing necessary for persons of this income?

Edward August

Schoharie

No more gun shows at Spa City Center

It is time to do the right thing and end the New EastCoast Arms Collectors Associates (NEACA) gun show at the Saratoga Springs City Center.

This is not a Second Amendment issue, although the gun show’s organizer David Petronis would have you believe it is. This is not a political football, although the media presents it as such. This is Economics 101. Ending the gun show at the City Center is the fiscally responsible thing to do.

The NEACA gun show is a profit loss for the City Center and local businesses. The typical customer of the gun show drives in for a few hours, makes a weapons purchase, and then returns home. The only one profiting off the show is David Petronis.

In the past, Mr. Petronis has requested that uniformed Saratoga Springs police officers roam the parking lots. This diverts the police from their official duties and cost taxpayers who pay the salaries of these city employees.

The City Center has simply outgrown the gun show. The Center has 32,000 square feet of convention space, over 200 hotel rooms, and soon a brand new multi-level parking garage. This is not the same place it was in the 1980s. Due to the logistics of how gun purchases are made, NEACA’s use of any part of the City Center makes it virtually impossible for simultaneous rental of available space, costing the City Center more income.

Unlike Mr. Petronis, I do not appeal to the paranoia and hyperbole surrounding the Second Amendment. The truth is, according to the state Attorney General’s office, gun sale infractions did occur at past NEACA shows.

If certain people could put politics aside, they would see that ending gun shows at the City Center will ensure a brighter future, both economically and otherwise, for Saratoga Springs.

Mike Winn

Saratoga Springs

The writer is a member of Saratogians for Gun Safety.

Guns in the home are harmful to children

A recent Gazette letter to the editor stated that a gun in the house was needed to protect children. Enclosed are a few news items, courtesy of Google, describing how guns were used to protect children and others. For some reason, they seem to show that guns are, in fact, dangerous to a child’s health and longevity. There are thousands of other such examples:

u Police charge father they say accidentally shot sleeping toddler Four-year-old accidentally shoots himself.

u Police Officer Accidentally Shoots 4-Year-Old: ‘Mommy Am I Gonna Die?’

u 13-year-old accidentally shoots woman.

u Man accidentally shoots himself, 5-year-old.

u Walmart shooting: Two-year old boy shoots mother dead in Idaho store with gun he found in her handbag.

u Police: Boy, 11, accidentally shoots and kills, brother, 12.

u 3-year-old accidentally shoots both parents.

u Ex-Marine dad teaching daughter, 12, about gun safety accidentally shoots her in arm.

And so on, and so on and so on.

Arnold Seiken

Schenectady

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