<> Schenectady deputy city clerk leaving for new job | The Daily Gazette
 

Subscriber login

News

Schenectady deputy city clerk leaving for new job

Schenectady deputy city clerk leaving for new job

Chad Putman to work with addiction-recovery service
Schenectady deputy city clerk leaving for new job
Deputy City Clerk Chad Putman sits in the City Hall rotunda in January 2016.
Photographer: PETER R. BARBER

Schenectady’s deputy city clerk is leaving his position at City Hall this month to work with a local addiction-recovery service.

Chad Putman, who started his role with the city in 2013, is taking a job with New Choices Recovery Center, the city’s primary substance-abuse service provider. His last day at City Hall will be July 28.

Putman, a 42-year-old Democrat, ran an unsuccessful campaign in 2016 to represent the 49th State Senate District. Putman lost to then-Assemblyman Jim Tedisco, R-Glenville, in a bid to replace long-time Sen. Hugh Farley.

Putman, who has a master’s degree in social work, said the specifics of his new job are still being worked out.

New Choices, at 302 State St., is the primary provider of outpatient and rehabilitation services in the city of Schenectady. It will be growing in the coming months, as it received a grant to become Schenectady County’s primary prevention program provider, an initiative that will get underway in the next month or so.

In addition, New Choices will be able to administer methadone later this year at its facility at 846 State St., thanks to state funding. The clinic is also expected to move sometime next year to a newer, larger space.

While at City Hall, Putman was an active member of Schenectady Pride, and chaired the city’s Manufacturing Week committee.

Putman’s exit is far from the first among City Hall employees in recent months. Director of Development Jackie Mancini took a job in March to work for the county, and Director of Operations David Fronk left City Hall in June for a similar post in Niskayuna. The city is still without a building inspector after Eric Shilling died in February.

View Comments
Hide Comments
0 premium 1 premium 2 premium 3 premium article articles remaining SUBSCRIBE TODAY
Thank you for reading. You have reached your 30-day premium content limit.
Continue to enjoy Daily Gazette premium content by becoming a subscriber or if you are a current print subscriber activate your online access.