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Ethiopian Airlines crash claims 157 lives

Student Gazette

Ethiopian Airlines crash claims 157 lives

Model's second crash in five months
Ethiopian Airlines crash claims 157 lives
An Abebe Bikila Boeing 787 Dreamliner from Ethiopian Airlines (ET) in 2015.
Photographer: EQRoy/Shutterstock

NEWS/FEATURES, Grades 3–6, 2nd Place

Ethiopia: On the morning of March 10, 2019, pilot Yared Getachew and his first officer had just finished in getting the plane set for takeoff. At 8:30 a.m. in Addis Ababa, flight ET 302 took off from Bole International.

Right away, Getachew realized that something was wrong. A flight radar later showed that the plane’s vertical speed kept changing. Getachew did not know this but he was scared and intent on keeping his passengers safe. He immediately sent out a distress call and was cleared to return. At Bole, officers were anxiously waiting for the Boeing.

Then, at approximately 8:44 a.m., all contact with the flight was lost. Everyone was confused. Had the plane gone to Nairobi, where the pilot loved going because it was his home, or did it crash while coming back? The sad truth came out at 10:48 a.m. that morning, when the prime minister tweeted condolences. This was the first word of the crash. At 11:15 a.m., the Airlines said that it believed that the plane crashed near Bishoftu about 30 miles from the capital. Then some fateful news spread from Ethiopia’s state broadcaster. All passengers and crew were dead. This is was not the first crash the model has faced. It is, in fact, the second crash in five months.

In October, a Lion Air Fight, a Boeing 37 Max 8 specifically, killed 189 people crashing into the java sea. Canada and the United States took some time, but now all countries have banned this plane as well as the FAAA. Relatives of the victims were given 1 kg of dirt. Hardly an exchange for their loved ones. Families of the Lion victims are steaming mad. Why wasn’t the problem fixed?

Most would agree with this opinion but one thing is for sure. The world needs to find a reliable way to transport people safely as a cohesive whole.

See all the winning entries from the 2019 Student Gazette here.

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