<> Letters to Editor for Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019 | The Daily Gazette
 

Subscriber login

Opinion

Letters to Editor for Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019

Letters to Editor for Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019

Your Voice

Celebrate work of direct support pros

This week (Sept. 8-14) is National Direct Support Professionals week.

Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) are the people you see throughout our community assisting individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities with shopping, working, and every other aspect of their lives.

DSPs are at work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week helping people achieve their goals and lead independent lives.

At Schenectady ARC, 80 percent of our workforce are DSPs.  

As a family-based, not-for-profit organization focused on serving people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities, we could not function without our committed and compassionate DSPs.

During National DSP week we are honoring our DSPs with lunches donated by our board of directors, and with raffles of gift cards and merchandise donated by grateful family members and our corporate partners.

During this week, we hope everyone will join us in celebrating these dedicated workers and thanking them for vital role they play in supporting people and making our communities diverse, inclusive, and better places to live.

Kirk Lewis

Schenectady

The writer is the executive director of Schenectady ARC.



The world cannot afford to lose wasps

Humanity has always had its quarrel with wasps.

They build nests in our homes and disturb everyday activities. But what society fails to see is the serenity and protection they bring to us. Our negligence in understanding the importance of their role in society could ultimately lead to sacrifice.

Despite the disgust and panic they instill upon us, wasps are extremely beneficial to our ecosystems. They prey on virtually every pest.

“Wasps are so adept at controlling pest populations that the agricultural industry now regularly deploys them to protect crops,” explains National Geographic.

According to the University College of London, next to bees, wasps are “humanity’s most ecologically and economically important organisms.” These pests also carry human diseases.

According to an article published by the New York Times, “Mr. Barron immediately retreated, and later sprayed hornet killer on the nest… He said that just angered the yellow jackets, the highly aggressive wasps that live in such colonies. Mr. Barron was stung 11 times.”

With that being said, are wasps really that dangerous to mankind?

Had Mr. Barron not sprayed the nest, his chances of getting stung are slim. “But most wasps are actually solitary, non-stinging varieties.

And all do far more good for humans…,” according to National Geographic. However wasps with the ability to sting only do so if they feel threatened.

Much like bees, wasps are suffering a decline, which humanity cannot afford.

If this continues, there will be less pollination and manage of pest control in crops.

Haley Surprenant

Sand Lake

View Comments
Hide Comments
0 premium 1 premium 2 premium 3 premium article articles remaining SUBSCRIBE TODAY
Thank you for reading. You have reached your 30-day premium content limit.
Continue to enjoy Daily Gazette premium content by becoming a subscriber or if you are a current print subscriber activate your online access.