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Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, Oct. 23

Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, Oct. 23

Your Voice

Why shut down road for motorcycles

Why would Niskayuna police (and others probably) shut down traffic on Balltown Road and adjacent roads to permit about 500 noisy, smelly motorcycles to go streaming south on Sunday a little after 1 p.m.?

Average citizens were inconvenienced and perhaps, like me, provoked. Was there some noble cause? It seems to me that shutting down highways is overreach for whatever purpose this was done. I do not recall seeing anything in The Gazette about this event and I read The Gazette every day. Any ideas?
Clifford Meacham
Glenville


Don’t jump the gun on limousine safety

Your Oct. 4 editorial “Limo laws: What took so long?” got key facts wrong, but more importantly it was a disservice to the families of the tragic Schoharie limousine crash.

America’s transportation experts at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) spent a year investigating that crash. They’re not done, but they released preliminary findings because they know those findings could save lives. If we press forward without their findings, we can get things wrong. Mistakes at this stage can cause even greater failures and delays.

The editors of this paper say they don’t need those investigative findings to have the answers, but their example is based on the unsupported idea that seat belts would have saved these victims. NTSB found: “the passenger seat belt systems on the Schoharie crash limousine were poorly designed and would not have provided adequate protection.”

We spent the past year working with victims’ families to develop comprehensive life-saving legislation. Not just seat belts. Seat assemblies. Certifying altered used vehicles. Crash safety. Evacuation options. Disclosure. Data recorders. Incentives to states to get dangerous vehicles off the roads. We introduced our legislation this week.

For the sake of these families, we must come together to enact meaningful, fact-based solutions that ensure limos like the one in the Schoharie accident are never allowed on the road again. Yes, sometimes doing things right takes time. We have worked with these families and taken that time. We owe it to them, and to each other, to get this right.
Paul Tonko
Amsterdam
The writer is congressman representing the 20th District.

 

Garcia knows Fourth Supreme Court area

My good friend Julie Garcia is running for one of the four open positions of Supreme Court Judge in the Fourth Judicial District. I fully support her candidacy for many reasons. I have known Julie for more than 20 years. Julie served as Essex County district attorney after working as an assistant district attorney in both Suffolk and Rensselaer counties. She now has a private practice in Warrensburg and Port Henry. She has experience as both a prosecutor and a defense lawyer.

Julie has always had the courage of her convictions to put people over politics. The Fourth Judicial District is large and predominantly rural in nature. Julie Garcia has lived and worked there most of her life. As the Essex County treasurer for more than 24 years, I know that the needs of rural New Yorkers are different from the needs of urban New Yorkers. We need judges who understand rural New Yorkers. Julie Garcia would be just that kind of a Supreme Court judge. I ask you to join me in supporting and voting for Julie Garcia on Nov. 5 for Supreme Court judge in the Fourth Judicial District.
Michael Diskin
Ticonderoga


Garcia well qualified for Supreme Court

As a practicing lawyer in the Fourth Judicial District for over 44 years I have encountered judges at all levels, from town courts to Supreme Court and beyond.

Like lawyers, judges are not perfect. Members of the bench, like members of the bar, can be good, bad and/or ugly. The candidate must possess various qualities, from fairness to an ability to tackle hard problems and to help resolve those problems with the assistance of competent trial counsel.

Julie Garcia has those qualities and then some.

Julie Garcia, if elected to our Supreme Court, would serve all residents of the Fourth Judicial District, but especially those residents who reside in counties north of Saratoga, where the core of a Supreme Court Justice can be measured by not only formal education (Siena College and Albany Law School) but more importantly, by the education that comes from a tough life.
For a great insight into her background, visit the New York State Bar Association webpage, State Bar News, and read a column on the lives of five rural lawyers. After you read that brief outline of Julie Garcia’s background, you will undoubtedly join me in voting for Julie Garcia for Supreme Court.
Dennis J. Tarantino, Esq.
Queensbury

 

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