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Charges filed in Town of Florida Shih Tsu neglect case; SPCA readies dogs for adoption

Charges filed in Town of Florida Shih Tsu neglect case; SPCA readies dogs for adoption

Charges filed in Town of Florida Shih Tsu neglect case; SPCA readies dogs for adoption
Ashley Boyle, an animal care manager, holds two of the rescued dogs Thursday at the Montgomery County SPCA
Photographer: Jason Subik/Gazette Reporter

FLORIDA -- A Duanesburg woman has been charged in connection with 14 Shih Tsu dogs found covered in urine and feces inside a building in the town of Florida this week, state police said Thursday.

The Montgomery County SPCA, meanwhile, worked to get the dogs cleaned up and on course for adoption, officials there said.

State police identified the owner of the dogs as Elizabeth A. Dolder, 46, of Duanesburg. She faces 14 counts of failing to provide proper sustenance, misdemeanors.

State police Wednesday responded to the property to check on the welfare of a number of dogs there. Troopers found the dogs, which did not have proper access to food and water and were living in poor conditions, state policed said.

State police contacted Dolder, who agreed to turn over the dogs to the Montgomery County SPCA, state police said. She then turned herself in to the state police in Fonda on the 14 charges and was released to appear in court later.

The dogs consisted of five adults and nine puppies. Ashley Boyle, an animal care manager at the Montgomery County SPCA, said the dogs were found covered in urine and feces. Boyle said the five adult dogs
were mothers nursing puppies.

The SPCA has had to work hard to get the dogs clean, Boyle said.

"They stunk up the whole entire building when they brought them in here, so they've been bathed at least twice, every single dog," Boyle said.

The dogs were underweight when they were brought to the animal shelter, and some of them were fighting over food, but not to the point of injuring each other, Boyle said.

The dogs will be quarantined for two weeks to see if any diseases manifest in the animals. Boyle said all of the dogs will receive shots and then be made available for adoption. The adults will be spayed or neutered, but the puppies will have to wait until they are older for those procedures.

"They're too young to spay/neuter now, so they'll be adopted, and they'll have to come back for a spay/neuter date later," she said.

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