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Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Feb. 2

Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Feb. 2

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People shouldn’t fear census participation

In 2010, Schenectady County suffered, as did New York state in general, by being undercounted in the 2010 census.
This affected representation and funding in a dramatic way, and we need to understand how important it is in 2020 to get an accurate count. This means that we need to reassure and enable folks who may not be eager or able to participate in this count.
I personally want to reassure folks who may not trust the federal government at the moment. My contacts with the people actually administering the census show that they are non-partisan and deeply committed to observing the law of confidentiality in the census.
It is illegal for them to share this information with ICE, local police, or anyone not directly associated with the census. They take that seriously. Individual information is just not available.
Many people reading this may not understand the distrust that is currently so palpable in many minority communities. It is up to us to help publicize the safety and importance of being counted.
This means talking about the safety and importance of this effort with churches, non-profits, clubs, stores, libraries and governmental agencies to get the word out and provide places where the information can be collected safely and easily.
This year, the information will be collected by mail, over the internet, over the phone and by live counters in the neighborhoods. Any of these can be used, and everyone is encouraged to do what they can.
Bill Levering
Schenectady


NY legal system isn’t protecting citizens

New York’s insane laws make the news once again. Six juveniles charged with the Crossgates Mall fight, but as the late Paul Harvey used to say, “That’s the rest of the story.” But in this case, what is the rest of the story? The juveniles began their night by allegedly stealing a U-Haul van and maybe another vehicle. Now, for whatever reason, they decided to head to Crossgates Mall for another whatever reason.
A fight was started, and some received stab wounds and fled the scene with the police in hot pursuit. (They did not obey the flashing red lights and the police sirens.)
One vehicle was stopped near the Thruway and the other crashed and damaged property by St. Peter’s Hospital.
Now here is the best part: All of the juveniles were charged but released to a guardian to appear in court on a later date.
The amazing New York state legal system releases the offenders who caused many thousands of dollars in damages and could have maimed or killed innocent pedestrians in their escape. Do the people of New York who obey and respect our laws see anything wrong with this legal system? It’s a shame the police do their job and charge the perpetrators, but the law releases them back to walk into the public.
Rick Splawnik
Amsterdam


Liberal politicians show a lack of caring

Kudos to the throngs of men and women, boys and girls, from all over our nation who made the trip to Washington, D.C., for the annual March for Life.
But where were our local liberal politicians? Oh, I forgot, they just don’t care.
Rich Kiffney
Amsterdam


Alcohol in theaters spoils the experience

Sara Foss has it right concerning alcohol in movie theaters (her Jan. 30 column “Allow alcohol in movie theaters?”). I have sat in Proctors with people next to me or near me drinking and in close quarters, over carpets and plush seats, and the odor is unpleasant, the risk of spills when passing to a seat or even waving an arm is always present.
And if the spilled popcorn and garbage left behind in a regular movie theater are any indication of behavior, alcohol will be next on the floor and chairs.
Linda Peterson
Round Lake

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