<> It's time for drivers to watch out for moose | The Daily Gazette
 

Subscriber login

blogs & columns

It's time for drivers to watch out for moose

Blue Line Bulletin

It's time for drivers to watch out for moose

The state Department of Environmental Conservation on Tuesday issued a reminder to motorists that September and October are the peak times for moose activity in northern New York. (Shutterstock)
The state Department of Environmental Conservation on Tuesday issued a reminder to motorists that September and October are the peak times for moose activity in northern New York. (Shutterstock)

ADIRONDACKS — Heads up to drivers in the Adirondacks: It's once again time to watch out for moose.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation on Tuesday issued a reminder to motorists that September and October are the peak times for moose activity in northern New York, as the animals are wandering in search of mates.

"While this improves the opportunities for people to enjoy sighting of a moose, it also increases the danger of colliding with one on the roadway," the department said.

Moose are much larger and taller than deer. Their larger body means that cause greater damage when struck, their height often causes them to impact the windshield of a car or pickup truck, not just the front of the vehicle. This past weekend, DEC said, there were three moose-vehicle accidents, and in each case the moose died. To date, there have been no recorded human fatalities resulting from an accident with a moose.

Moose are most active at dawn and dusk, which are times of poor visibility. Moose are especially difficult to see at night because of their dark brown to black coloring and their height -- which puts their head and much of their body above vehicle headlights.

The state's advise to drivers: Slow down in moose country, especially at dawn or dusk, watch roadsides for animal activity, and be extremely cautious is a moose is observed. It's okay to flash your lights or otherwise warn other drivers if you've seen a moose.

There are believed to be several hundred moose in the Adirondacks; they reside as far south as northern Saratoga County, and traveling animals are sometimes seen in the Capital Region.

More information about moose can be found on the DEC website at www.dec.ny.gov/animals/6964.html